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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok this isn't a spam post. However, it will probably be my only post because I'm not currently an owner.

I have been interested in the C-HR but at £29K with 4WD, it's simply too expensive compared to comparable cars which cost around £5K less.

If you're wondering, why I'm posting this therefore, it's simply because the TRD addresses many of the issues apart from price (and the lack of a manual gearbox on the powerful version - take note Toyota, emission levels are irrelevant in the UK tax regime after April 2017 - £140 flat rate charge for all cars except totally plug-in electric after initial purchase).

I'm also posting it because I came across a drawn version in the gallery whilst looking for information on the C-HR, which had the simple comment too OTT for me. I thought that was a little unfair from a drawing alone.

So without further ado, some nice pics from, this website of the reported 2 versions - the Aggressive and Extreme:

Personally, I think the extreme is fabulous but others may like the track look of the aggressive better.

http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2017/01/toyota-dresses-up-the-c-hr-and-86-with-trd-parts-for-2017-tokyo-auto-salon.html

Extreme (Paris / Dakar off road type):





Aggressive (Track racing type)





I think the big problem again will be price. If the 4WD standard car costs over £29K with the parking sensor option (standard on the £5K cheaper cars), then I imagine the TRD version will be well into the low £30K's.
 

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Track IMO looks nicer, without those stupid mudflaps that looks as though an infant has cut out, although track does somewhat look like a melted Stormtrooper! :)

Is TRD just a body kit without any performance enhancements? If so it's more form over substance, which has never been my style....like those 'rice-boys' who stick a tin can exhaust, larger alloys and lots of spoilers....all that does on a standard engine is make it go slower.

What I'd like to see is a tuned engine, proper balanced backflow zaust (with decent tips) and a performance air filter.
 

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Let's not use the changes to UK road tax to encourage manufacturers to increase CO2 emissions again,. Climate change folks, climate change. We need to be doing all we can to reduce emissions and encourage electric and hybrid technology.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
MarkyMUK said:
Track IMO looks nicer, without those stupid mudflaps that looks as though an infant has cut out, although track does somewhat look like a melted Stormtrooper! :)

Is TRD just a body kit without any performance enhancements? If so it's more form over substance, which has never been my style....like those 'rice-boys' who stick a tin can exhaust, larger alloys and lots of spoilers....all that does on a standard engine is make it go slower.

What I'd like to see is a tuned engine, proper balanced backflow zaust (with decent tips) and a performance air filter.
I understand Toyota has a 200 bhp engine 1.6 turbo in development, however, I have seen it posted on a web site that the TRD version will have 3 options, the 2 existing engines and a 150bhp 2.0 litre engine. I can't confirm this: http://handi.tech/toyota-c-hr-trd-edition/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Perrinss said:
Let's not use the changes to UK road tax to encourage manufacturers to increase CO2 emissions again,. Climate change folks, climate change. We need to be doing all we can to reduce emissions and encourage electric and hybrid technology.
I'm not encouraging anybody. However, it is probably inevitable. Then again, the rush to gutless engines was a retrograde step anyway in my opinion. What we always needed was an option for power with eco credentials, not just power or eco alone.

I'm surprised that Toyota didn't go down the route of putting much larger electric motors on the prius engine for the CH-r, say 50 bhp each. That would potentially have given the CH-r over 200bhp of green power. It's perfectly feasible btw. The Tesla Model S uses over 750bhp of electric motors and still has a range of over 200 miles. The only thing with that level of performance is it becomes cost prohibitive.

However, smaller 50bhp motors should have been feasible and Mitsubishi have a small 4x4 that's totally electric with @200bhp of electric motors (4 x @50bhp per wheel) scheduled for release next year (240 mile range). An opportunity missed by Toyota I think.

It has to be said though, that in my opinion, the 2 standard car's engines are both lacking in power and green credentials in any event. The hybrid from the Prius is underpowered for a vehicle of this type (and looks) and the Petrol is equally underpowered but also un-green at 147g co2. Also, very few people want automatics but are being pushed there by CO2 considerations by manufacturers. Again though, not necessary.

To contrast, Suzuki have a 1.4 turbo engine (1.4 boosterjet) with 146 bhp for 127g CO2 on a manual 4x4. That's a lot more power for less CO2 on a manual gearbox than Toyota. That is quiet surprising given Toyota's past engine prowess.
 

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RHC said:
Perrinss said:
However, smaller 50bhp motors should have been feasible
C-HR has a 53KW electric motor which is capable to provide much more power. However all Toyota/Lexus hybrids are limited by the battery which has low capacity, old technology (Ni-MH) and air-cooled. More electric power would require water cooling or significant increase of capacity - more complex, heavy and expensive solution only feasible for pure EV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
JulianoG said:
RHC said:
Perrinss said:
However, smaller 50bhp motors should have been feasible
C-HR has a 53KW electric motor which is capable to provide much more power. However all Toyota/Lexus hybrids are limited by the battery which has low capacity, old technology (Ni-MH) and air-cooled. More electric power would require water cooling or significant increase of capacity - more complex, heavy and expensive solution only feasible for pure EV.
Tesla don't have water cooling on their electric motors so far as I'm aware. They do use Li Batteries though.

Tesla use 11KW of charging on board, expandable to 14KW (model s). But bearing in mind this is pure ev and @750bhp, it's not surprising.

I wouldn't have thought the battery pack for a C-HR would need to be anywhere that large or require as much charging for a powerful hyrbid C-Hr and would have thought that much of the charging could be provided by a recovery system that takes uses the braking cycle to charge the battery.

The Model 3, seems to promise high performance for around £30K, so it would appear Toyota should be able to produce something with a fraction of the Model 3's electric power as an assist system for the kind of pricing we're seeing now. The only question is why they haven't. Seems like a missed opportunity. There's no doubt a TRD version will have better performance, but it's going to be a real shame if it uses an old design of 2.0 engine with poor emissions / economy to achieve it, when either a small turbo petrol or preferably a more powerful hybrid could have probably done it with greater green / fuel benefits.
 
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