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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just about to collect my 1.8 GR (with regret to the 2.0, as it was much longer waiting time at the moment of placing an order). I've read in official Toyota materials, as the 2.0 engine is capable of using EV on a motorway speed (up to 75mph), but I could not find any mention if the post lift 1.8 hybrid works on the same principle (i.e. partially able to drive on EV but kicks off the engine more frequent) or works as the old generation 1.8 hybrid i.e. after certain speed, only works on petrol?

Any practical experience?
 

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I can't talk about newer 1.8. I had a 2018 1.8 and it was never turning off ICE above 50km/h.
They changed the philosophy for at least 2.0 engine. I wrote here before, fuel consumption didn't increase in any significant way between the 2 cars, not for long trips, above 20km.
For short trips 2.0 is using much more fuel. Mostly to warm the cabin.
1.8 is a great great engine! Can't go wrong! Yes, 2.0 is much more powerful and fun if you're looking for fun. But if you're not looking for sport, 1.8 is a reliable good engine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes, already seen some POVs' on YT and indeed they changed the philosophy, seen 1.8 after lift coasting around 60 mph (95 km/h) with the EV mode on and off constantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My 2.0 regularly goes into EV near 70.

Getting mid 60s as average on everyday usage without trying for economy at present
Correct, that's what I was aware, I was unsure about 1.8, yet it looks that the entire IV generation uses the same principle (they advertise it self charging hybrid)
 

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Correct, that's what I was aware, I was unsure about 1.8, yet it looks that the entire IV generation uses the same principle (they advertise it self charging hybrid)
This being my first hybrid 2.0 also, I think that using the Adaptive Cruise is a simpler way of maximising fuel economy especially on motorway trips and let the car do its stuff. Quite a few hills where we live like Drabisan says shorter trips can sometimes knock it down quite a bit. I would think that's there's alot of folks here who have tried all sorts of methods regarding economy.
I'm sure you'll still enjoy the car tho,btw this site might have to be renamed The GR Forum🙈
 

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Ah interesting question, but I'd actually advise you to alter your thinking a little bit. The speed at which EV mode is used is very variable, I think the figures you've seen are probably to maintain speed on a level road with certain loading, temperature and battery charge assumptions.

Remember it's ultimately a petrol car - the battery is like a buffer, or a revolving door for energy. It absorbs energy from braking or spare energy from the engine, and releases it the next time you need to accelerate.
So if you're trying to maximise EV mode running, you're misunderstanding the system a little.

The efficiency isn't from operating solely in EV mode, it's from ironing out all the little peaks and troughs in the whole journey. The car will be optimising itself according to multiple variables - friction, accelerator demand, battery charge status, engine status etc. I learned a while ago not to worry about when EV mode did/didn't activate, and trust the system to optimise itself according to the present variables.
 

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Ah interesting question, but I'd actually advise you to alter your thinking a little bit. The speed at which EV mode is used is very variable, I think the figures you've seen are probably to maintain speed on a level road with certain loading, temperature and battery charge assumptions.

Remember it's ultimately a petrol car - the battery is like a buffer, or a revolving door for energy. It absorbs energy from braking or spare energy from the engine, and releases it the next time you need to accelerate.
So if you're trying to maximise EV mode running, you're misunderstanding the system a little.

The efficiency isn't from operating solely in EV mode, it's from ironing out all the little peaks and troughs in the whole journey. The car will be optimising itself according to multiple variables - friction, accelerator demand, battery charge status, engine status etc. I learned a while ago not to worry about when EV mode did/didn't activate, and trust the system to optimise itself according to the present variables.
I agree with that also,when we first got the car I was infatuated with the little green fella. But now I just let the car and it's software management do its own thing. Conditions also play a factor also,windy rain etc it's not very aerodynamic especially for a motorway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ah interesting question, but I'd actually advise you to alter your thinking a little bit. The speed at which EV mode is used is very variable, I think the figures you've seen are probably to maintain speed on a level road with certain loading, temperature and battery charge assumptions.

Remember it's ultimately a petrol car - the battery is like a buffer, or a revolving door for energy. It absorbs energy from braking or spare energy from the engine, and releases it the next time you need to accelerate.
So if you're trying to maximise EV mode running, you're misunderstanding the system a little.

The efficiency isn't from operating solely in EV mode, it's from ironing out all the little peaks and troughs in the whole journey. The car will be optimising itself according to multiple variables - friction, accelerator demand, battery charge status, engine status etc. I learned a while ago not to worry about when EV mode did/didn't activate, and trust the system to optimise itself according to the present variables.

of course you're right, it is an ultimate petrol car, with the EV working as a buffer, I did not get a misconception with BWM I3 Range Extender, where in principle it is an electric car with the petrol engine for charging battery, I just wanted to know how it has been developed compared to the older generation of Toyota hybrids, where petrol engine kicked in above certain speed and there was no way to drive even 50 yards using EV mode. Now this element has been improved, as far as I've seen both, for 1.8 and 2.0 engines. Probably the moments it can drive solely using EV are slightly longer for 2.0, as it has a larger capacity battery...
 

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Just drove back from the new forest, mixed driving, A & B roads, motorways and traffic jams.

Wasn’t making any effort to drive economically, just keeping up with traffic and sitting on speed limits where able toon the faster roads.

Still got 65 mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just drove back from the new forest, mixed driving, A & B roads, motorways and traffic jams.

Wasn’t making any effort to drive economically, just keeping up with traffic and sitting on speed limits where able toon the faster roads.

Still got 65 mpg.
excellent, what engine do you have 1.8 or 2.0?
 

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excellent, what engine do you have 1.8 or 2.0?
2.0

As someone posted above, the EV has a complex set of rules, engine temp, voltage needed, speed, charge state, acceleration etc.
My EV light was on at 70 at times, but I was in auto cruise a lot, so car did it’s own thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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I have a 1.8GR sport, picked it up in November. I actually think it’s slightly less economical than my previous 1.8 Dynamic but I can’t work out why. May be the larger wheels or simply I’m not driving it as well! I had about 67MPG in the Dynamic and about 62MPG in the GR Sport.

I can confirm that EV is not limited to a certain speed. I often see the EV light come on when on the motorway etc.

Just want to comment on a common misconception, the car is great at working out when and when not to use EV but that is not related to using adaptive cruise control which is less efficient. The cruise control won’t adapt as far ahead as a human. You may see traffic slowing down and adapt accordingly, taking your foot off the gas but if left in cruise, it’ll drive up to the obstruction and then apply the brakes which is less efficient.
 

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I have a 1.8GR sport, picked it up in November. I actually think it’s slightly less economical than my previous 1.8 Dynamic but I can’t work out why. May be the larger wheels or simply I’m not driving it as well! I had about 67MPG in the Dynamic and about 62MPG in the GR Sport.

I can confirm that EV is not limited to a certain speed. I often see the EV light come on when on the motorway etc.

Just want to comment on a common misconception, the car is great at working out when and when not to use EV but that is not related to using adaptive cruise control which is less efficient. The cruise control won’t adapt as far ahead as a human. You may see traffic slowing down and adapt accordingly, taking your foot off the gas but if left in cruise, it’ll drive up to the obstruction and then apply the brakes which is less efficient.
I tend to use ACC so I don’t have to worry about speed cameras... especially the average speed ones that are popping up all over the place now
Agree sometimes it’s a bit late as can only ‘see’ the cars directly in front, not further up the road
 
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